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Conference Schedule

Note: Check back often for additions and changes to the schedule. All of the below sessions will be live at the time listed. Additional pre-recorded content will be available as well. All times listed are Central Time (CT).


Early Law Enforcement Sessions

Tuesdays:
February 16
(Part 1)
February 23
(Part 2)
March 2
(Part 3)
1:00pm-3:00pm

Law Enforcement needs to be a Jack of All Trades, but most don’t know Jack about De-escalation: Parts 1, 2, and 3 (2-hour sessions)
Track: Law Enforcement + more information

Presenter: Sgt. Christopher Bartolotta and Nancy McGee, JD

BartolottaMcgee The first 15 to 45 minutes of any crisis incident are the most critical of any time frame during an incident. The average crisis management team’s response time is 45 to 60 minutes. Then, if you add into the mix the unknown effects of alcohol and drugs ingested by the subject and/or the dark shadow of the many mental health issues that are prominent within society today, you have a recipe for an unmitigated disaster. Therefore, it makes sense that the initial responding Law Enforcement Officer should attempt to initiate a dialog with a subject to de-escalate the confrontation in order to start the process of lowering tensions. However, many of our first responders are ill prepared to deal with one facet of this recipe, let alone mixing all of it together. This pre-conference session will expose the attendee to the numerous aspects of the crisis state, including mental health and suicide awareness, as well as, the de-escalation techniques used to manage many of these situations, by the conclusion of the session.

March 2021

Click here to download a PDF of the March schedule!
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
  1 2 3 4 5
10:00am
Opening Session

The Road Ahead: Implementing Lessons Learned from COVID-19 to Propel Us Forward
6
7 8
10:00am
Using ASTP (Alcohol Skills Training program) to Minimize Student Drinking Risk
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
9
Your choice:
3:00pm or 8:00pm

Law Enforcement Supporting Civil Discourse While Avoiding Civil Disturbances on Campus
Track: Law Enforcement
10
1:00pm
Planning within a Framework: Suicide Prevention
Track: Mental Health
11
10:00am
Putting the Peer in Advocacy: Students as Confidential Advocates on College Campuses
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX
12
9:00am-12:00pm,
1:00pm-4:00pm

FSL Leadership Day
13
14 15
1:00pm
This is Your Brain on Opioids. This is Your Brain on Trauma
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
16
Your choice:
3:00pm or 8:00pm

R.A.D. Systems for College Credit
Track: Law Enforcement
17
10:00am
CALM – Conversations on Access to Lethal Means
Track: Mental Health
18
1:00pm
Don’t Leave Out the Good Stuff: Sex-Positive Prevention
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX
19
10:00am
Reaching in to Reach out: One University’s Journey in Developing a Student Well-being Collaboration
Track: Health and Well-Being
20
21 22
10:00am
Clearing up Clouds of Confusion about Cannabis and Vaping Technology
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
23
1:00pm
Mood Altering Substances: Kratom and other Prevalent Synthetic Substances
Track: Law Enforcement
24
1:00pm
Ask, Listen, Refer: Implementing Suicide Prevention Curriculum on Campus
Track: Mental Health
25
10:00am
2 Hour Special Extended Session: Title IX: Updates and Special Issues
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX
26
1:00pm
Inclusion from the Ground Up!
Track: Health and Well-Being
27
28 29
10:00am
References Available Upon Request: Learning How to Propel Prevention Forward Through Service
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
30
Your choice:
3:00pm or 8:00pm

Today’s DWI Testimony: Video on Trial
Track: Law Enforcement
31
1:00pm
Addressing Mental Health in the Clinic Setting
Track: Mental Health
     

The 2021 Meeting of the Minds training series, is planned by Missouri Partners in Prevention, with funding from the Missouri Department of Mental Health and the Missouri Department of Transportation. Missouri Partners in Prevention is partnering with the Central College Health Association as a sponsor of our Health and Well-Being track and the Missouri Eliminate Tobacco Use Initiative as a sponsor of our Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug track.


April 2021

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
        1
1:00pm-2:00pm
Sustainability, Partnerships, and Public Health: Developing a Comprehensive Plan for Sexual Violence Prevention
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX
2
10:00am-11:00am
Enhancing the Virtual Wellness Coaching Experience for College Students
Track: Health and Well-Being
3
4 5
10:00am-11:00am
Why Should We Invest our Resources to Implement BASICS on Our Campus?
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
6
1:00pm-2:00pm
QPR for Emergency Service Professionals
Track: Law Enforcement
7
1:00pm-2:00pm
Suicide Prevention: A Move toward Wellness on College Campuses
Track: Mental Health
8
10:00am-11:00am
How to Create an Intersectional Bystander Movement
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX
9
12:00pm-6:00pm
Peer Education Virtual Leadership Weekend
10
9:00am-12:00pm
Peer Education Virtual Leadership Weekend
11 12



13
10:00am-11:00am
Menthol is the Back Story: Decriminalization of Commercial Tobacco Products - An Important Way to Make Black Lives Matter
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
14
1:00pm-2:00pm
Caring for Yourself While Caring for Students: Advice & Strategies from a Mental Health Counselor
Track: Mental Health
15
10:00am-11:00am
Hazing and Consent Training: The Social Science of Hazing
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX
16
1:00pm-2:00pm
Coloring Outside the Lines: How Encouraging Creativity in Academia Can Support Student Success
Track: Health and Well-Being
17
18 19
10:00am-11:00am
Cannabis 101: The Basics on Cannabis/Marijuana and Discussing the Science with Students
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
20
10:00am-11:00am
Supporting Tobacco-free Policy Implementation and Compliance
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
21
10:00am-11:00am
Re-examining Suicidality using a Racially Conscious Framework
Track: Mental Health
22
10:00am-11:00am
Coordinating A Violence Prevention Program During a Pandemic
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX
23
1:00pm-2:00pm
Medical Marijuana: Regulation, Current Evidence, and Recent Trends
Track: Health and Well-Being
24
25 26
1:00pm-2:00pm
A Timeline of the Opioid Epidemic: How did we Create this Perfect Storm?
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
27
1:00pm-2:00pm
Alcohol, Marijuana and Athletic Team Success
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
28
10:00am-11:00am
Thwarting Suicide: Advanced Trauma-Informed Strategies
Track: Mental Health
29
1:00pm-2:00pm
There’s Hope! Healing from Interpersonal and Sexual Violence
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX
30  

May 2021

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
            1
2 3 4
1:00pm-2:00pm
E-cigarettes, Vaping, and Evidence-based Tobacco Treatment among College Students
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
5
1:00pm-2:00pm
Mental Health Screening on College Campuses
Track: Mental Health
6 7
10:00am-12:00pm
Closing Session:
Experiences in Effective Prevention: Past, Present, and Future
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15

The 2021 Meeting of the Minds training series, is planned by Missouri Partners in Prevention, with funding from the Missouri Department of Mental Health and the Missouri Department of Transportation. Missouri Partners in Prevention is partnering with the Central College Health Association as a sponsor of our Health and Well-Being track and the Missouri Eliminate Tobacco Use Initiative as a sponsor of our Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug track.



Week 1: March 8-12

Monday, March 8
10:00am-11:00am

Using ASTP (Alcohol Skills Training program) to Minimize Student Drinking Risk
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs + more information

Presenter: Ashley Hinton-Moncer, M.S., MPH, Director of Student Wellness, University of Kentucky

For a long time, research has established that information alone does not always change behavior. Alcohol Skills Training Program (ASTP) aims to educate students about alcohol use, while increasing their interest in critically examining their own drinking patterns. With the use of motivational interviewing techniques as the foundation of the program, ASTP aims to deliver information to students that help them make more informed choices about drinking in hopes of minimizing potential risks through a combination of preventative action, reduced consumption, and abstinence. Attendees will learn how you can incorporate a similar program at your institution. The first part of this session will be spent engaging with the content of ASTP. The latter part of the session will focus on the question, “now what”? Is ASTP a good fit for my campus? How can I go about implementing ASTP? Why is this work important?

Tuesday, March 9
3:00pm 4:00pm or
8:00pm-9:00pm

Law Enforcement Supporting Civil Discourse While Avoiding Civil Disturbances on Campus
Track: Law Enforcement + more information

Presenter: Lt. Amanda Cullin, Northwest Missouri State University Police Department

The First Amendment of the United States Constitution protects our freedom of speech, religion, press, peaceful protest and the right to petition the government. Campuses across the United States foster and facilitate our First Amendment Rights through civil discourse in and out of the classroom. Campus law enforcement departments are on the front lines of maintaining the peace while protecting these First Amendment Rights. Prepare yourself, your team, and your department by exploring the options and resources available and engaging your peers through collaboration and discussion.

Wednesday, March 10
1:00pm-2:00pm

Planning within a Framework: Suicide Prevention
Track: Mental Health + more information

Presenter: Kathleen Ratcliff, MPA, CPS, Executive Director, Upstream Prevention Inc.

After researching successful approaches to suicide reduction, the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention identified seven essential elements of suicide care. The Zero Suicide framework is a system-wide, organizational commitment to safer suicide care in health and behavioral health care systems, but can be applied to the community and campus-based suicide prevention efforts. Utilizing an existing system can assist entities to build the strongest local suicide prevention plan. This session will provide an overview of the framework, but walk participants through a strategic planning process they can replicate in their own self-defined community.

Thursday, March 11
10:00am-11:00am

Putting the Peer in Advocacy: Students as Confidential Advocates on College Campuses
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX + more information

Presenters: Cinnamon Brown, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Associate Dean of Faculty; Kali Wright-Smith, Director of First Year Experience, Westminster College

In 2015, Westminster College began a peer advocacy program as a form of response and prevention to gender-based violence on campus. Through the campus’ Remley Women’s Center, student interns are trained to serve as advocates and confidential sources that provide support and resources to survivors and the general student body in matters dealing with gender-based violence. Through regular office hours and now a new virtual platform, student interns serve as a first line of support and resources for their peers. In this program we will talk about the creation, evolution, and successes of our peer advocacy program and how we are now taking it into a more virtual space to truly meet our students where they are.

Friday, March 12
9:00am-12:00pm, 1:00pm-4:00pm

FSL Leadership Day
+ more information

Presenters: Cinnamon Brown, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Associate Dean of Faculty; Kali Wright-Smith, Director of First Year Experience; Kasi Lacey, Vice President and Dean of Student Life, Westminster College

In 2015, Westminster College began a peer advocacy program as a form of response and prevention to gender-based violence on campus. Through the campus’ Remley Women’s Center, student interns are trained to serve as advocates and confidential sources that provide support and resources to survivors and the general student body in matters dealing with gender-based violence. Through regular office hours and now a new virtual platform, student interns serve as a first line of support and resources for their peers. In this program we will talk about the creation, evolution, and successes of our peer advocacy program and how we are now taking it into a more virtual space to truly meet our students where they are.

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Week 2: March 15-19

Monday, March 15
1:00pm-2:00pm

This is Your Brain on Opioids. This is Your Brain on Trauma
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Dr. Fred Rottnek, Professor and Program Director, Addiction Medicine Fellowship, Saint Louis University

Many of us remember one of the iterations of the Public Service Announcement: This is Your Brain on Drugs. Although the war on drugs has had many unintended negative consequences, we remember the egg in the skillet, a powerful image connecting brain function to drug use. Since the 80’s, we’ve learned much about the effects of both trauma and opioids on brain structure and chemistry. In this workshop, we will provide participants the tools to confidently discuss the basic science of the surprisingly similar effects of trauma and opioids on the brain, as well as discuss evidence-based intervention to increase safety for people dealing with substance use and trauma.

Tuesday, March 16
3:00pm 4:00pm or
8:00pm-9:00pm

R.A.D. Systems for College Credit
Track: Law Enforcement + more information

Presenter: Chief Ken Kennedy, Missouri Southern State University

This session will prepare an individual police officer to move an existing R.A.D. self-defense course to a for-credit college class. Being a traditional college class makes it more attractive to college females as they need hours to complete a degree and remain more committed. During an entire semester the students become very proficient in protecting themselves. The officer will learn the steps to navigate the college accreditation system to ensure that the class can be certified for college credit.

Wednesday, March 17
10:00am-11:00am

CALM – Conversations on Access to Lethal Means
Track: Mental Health + more information

Presenter: Elizabeth Makulec, Executive Director, KUTO (Kids Under Twenty One)

Reducing access to lethal means, such as firearms and medication, can determine whether a person at risk for suicide lives or dies, and is an internationally evidence-based prevention tactic. Conversations on Access to Lethal Means – CALM - will teach participants to be alert to signs that suicidal thoughts and behaviors could be present, how to use that information to have a conversation about risk and access to lethal means, and how to encourage ‘time and distance’ as a safety intervention when risk for suicide is present. CALM is a project of the Safer Homes Collaborative, a joint effort of the gun-owning and suicide prevention communities to raise awareness that suicide can be prevented through safe gun storage. The SHC encourages gun owners to include suicide prevention as the 11th Commandment of gun safety.

Thursday, March 18
1:00pm-2:00pm

Don’t Leave Out the Good Stuff: Sex-Positive Prevention
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX + more information

Presenter: Danielle Devers, Outreach and Engagement Coordinator, University of Missouri Columbia

The reduction of STIs and unintended pregnancy are noble causes to champion, however public health efforts for prevention around sexual health are often built on a discourse of danger and disease. The possibility of having both pleasurable and safe sexual experiences is all too frequently disregarded. We will examine the role that pleasure can play in reducing STIs and unintended pregnancy, and we will engage in activities to increase comfort with pleasure-centered discussions.

Friday, March 19
10:00am-11:00am

Reaching in to Reach out: One University’s Journey in Developing a Student Well-being Collaboration
Track: Health and Well-Being + more information

Presenter: Ashley Hinton-Moncer, M.S., MPH, Director of Student Wellness, University of Kentucky

With growing concentration on addressing student well-being, how can campus partners collaborate to adequately address these issues? This session will describe the process in which the University of Kentucky launched its WellKentucky initiative utilizing theoretical underpinnings of health promotion and mental health outreach, effective coalition building, and strategic planning. The presenter will discuss the programs successes, challenges, and lessons learned while allowing participants an opportunity for shared learning, group dialogue, and tangible resources to successfully recreate a similar opportunity at their respective institutions.

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Week 3: March 22-March 26

Monday, March 22
10:00am-11:00am

Clearing up Clouds of Confusion about Cannabis and Vaping Technology
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Linda C. Hancock, FNP, Ph.D.

Cannabis and cannabinoids are the most misunderstood molecules on the market today. Vaping technology has pervaded our culture and impacts both cannabinoid and nicotine use. Join this interactive session on zoom and participate via your mobile device as well. The goal is to share credible information that you can use for practical harm reduction, prevention and early intervention strategies.

Tuesday, March 23
1:00pm-2:00pm

Mood Altering Substances: Kratom and other Prevalent Synthetic Substances
Track: Law Enforcement + more information

Presenter: Sgt. Christopher Bartolotta

The world of better living through chemistry gets more difficult everyday with the advent of the internet. What we know today within the ‘drug culture’ can dramatically change by tomorrow. And our youth are being given misguided information that is not factually based. This conference session will expose the attendee to the new and ever changing concepts of “being under the influence”, understanding the recent drug trends (statewide and nationally), help recognizing the new terminology of synthetic psychoactive substances, recognizing the different drug categories and the associated signs and symptoms and how the Standardized Field Sobriety Tests (SFST’s) can be effectively facilitated to identify impairment.

Wednesday, March 24
1:00pm-2:00pm

Ask, Listen, Refer: Implementing Suicide Prevention Curriculum on Campus
Track: Mental Health + more information

Presenter: Margo Leitschuh, Communications Coordinator, Missouri Partners in Prevention

Missouri Partners in Prevention created the Ask. Listen. Refer. (ALR) online suicide prevention training to assist campuses in providing free and accessible gatekeeper training for students, faculty and staff. Join us to learn more about how the training is implemented, how it has been adapted to be taught in-person, and how campuses have integrated ALR in comprehensive suicide prevention efforts.

Thursday, March 25
10:00am-12:00pm

2 Hour Special Extended Session: Title IX: Updates and Special Issues
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX + more information

Presenter: Peter Lake, Professor of law, Charles A. Dana Chair, and the Director of the Center for Excellence in Higher Education Law and Policy at Stetson University College of Law

The new Title IX regulations were rolled out in May 2020 (with an effective date in August) giving campuses a tight window –during a pandemic—to come into compliance. There was no time for beta testing, and for many campuses barely enough time to make major required changes in campus codes. Campuses have been grappling with a variety of compliance challenges. What are campuses finding most difficult to implement; what has worked effectively so far? How are campuses handling informal resolution? The role of advisors? How are campuses staffing the new grievance systems? What new regulatory and litigation issues do campuses face, particularly in light of a change in federal administration with a distinctly different agenda? What changes could be on the horizon with the new Biden administration, and what it the timeline for change? How could the SCOTUS or Congress interject? Join Title IX expert Peter Lake as he explores these issues and more.

Friday, March 26
1:00pm-2:00pm

Inclusion from the Ground Up!
Track: Health and Well-Being + more information

Presenters: Christy Hutton, Ph.D., Director, Wellness Resource Center, University of Missouri, and Ashley Brickley, Director, Disability Center, University of Missouri

Wellness peers and programs are often highly focused on inclusivity, creating programs and initiatives to enhance the well-being of every student. In the context of inclusion, people with disabilities are often an afterthought. While it is not uncommon for an event to be adapted for a person with a disability, rarely are programs designed from the beginning with disability in mind. This session will discuss the Social Model of Disability as a construct for social justice and a spring board for greater inclusivity. From curb cuts to more complex considerations of disability as an aspect of identity and a social justice issue, you will leave this session empowered to create programs that are inclusive from the ground up.

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Week 4: March 29-April 2

Monday, March 29
10:00am-11:00am

References Available Upon Request: Learning How to Propel Prevention Forward Through Service
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Allison Smith, Program Administrator for Louisiana Higher Education Network, Louisiana Board of Regents

In this session, attendees will be reminded of the power of cultivating collaborative relationships both on and off college campuses. This session will be geared to small and/or understaffed entities who are charged with servicing a large populace with limited time and resources. Additional topics to be covered will be choosing opportunities that yield the best return on your time investment, building statewide rapport, and leveraging your relationships all while meeting mandated and/or funding requirements. Examples of successful campus-community collaborations will be shared with attendees. Attendees will also be able to see how the accumulation of “small” wins can result in “big” payoff --- like the establishment of a Collegiate Recovery Program.

Tuesday, March 30
3:00pm 4:00pm or
8:00pm-9:00pm

Today’s DWI Testimony: Video on Trial
Track: Law Enforcement + more information

Presenter: Sgt. Joe Jennings, University of Central Missouri Police Department

Dash cameras have long been in use by law enforcement, but within the past decade, the prevalence of body cameras has continued to increase. Body cameras mutually benefit law enforcement and communities by showing, at least partially, an officer’s perspective. With the increased use of body cameras in driving while intoxicated cases, this video can either help or hinder criminal prosecution and administrative processes. Video evidence from body cameras either can definitively show what an officer reports or testifies to or it can bring the officer’s credibility into question. This course will assist participants in understanding how to utilize their body cameras effectively to provide unquestionable video evidence in trial in addition to articulating and explaining body camera video in reports and testimony.

Wednesday, March 31
1:00pm-2:00pm

Addressing Mental Health in the Clinic Setting
Track: Mental Health + more information

Presenter: Judy Frueh, Assistant Director of Wellness Services- Clinic Services, Northwest Missouri State University

Come learn how one college health center has incorporated evidence based practices to assess mental health in the clinic setting at every visit. Learn how you can implement the same techniques in your office while still maintaining efficient quality care. We will also discuss the campus resources available to the students.

Thursday, April 1
1:00pm-2:00pm

Sustainability, Partnerships, and Public Health: Developing a Comprehensive Plan for Sexual Violence Prevention
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX + more information

Presenter: Sarah Ehrhard Reid, Sexual Violence Prevention Program Representative, Women’s Health, Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services

Ending Sexual Violence on campus is an important, complex, and demanding goal. Working alone or without a plan makings it even more difficult. In this presentation, we will explore the variety of ways campuses can build a sustainable prevention plan, including building unique and new partnerships. Participants will review tools from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Health and Senior Services that can help participants address sexual violence prevention on campus.

Friday, April 2
10:00am-11:00am

Enhancing the Virtual Wellness Coaching Experience for College Students
Track: Health and Well-Being + more information

Presenter: Ivan Mendoza, Professional Intern and Raika Sethi, Undergraduate Student, Wellness Programs, Purdue University - RecWell

Health and wellness coaching is rapidly developing. Health coaches can help clients maintain behavior change by implementing psychology, physical activity, and nutrition principles through skillful conversations. Our student wellness coaches keep peers accountable with goals, share stress-reducing techniques, and provide a plan to maintain change. Join us in the discussion of improving the wellness coaching process virtually, and how - when used effectively - telehealth can foster new health behaviors.

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Week 5: April 5-April 10

Monday, April 5
10:00am-11:00am

Why Should We Invest our Resources to Implement BASICS on Our Campus?
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Jessica M. Cronce, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Counseling Psychology and Human Services, University of Oregon

Over roughly the past 20 years, substantial effort and financial support has been directed toward creation of user-friendly tools to help colleges and universities select evidence-based alcohol prevention strategies and dissemination of that information. In 2002, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Task Force on College Drinking sent a copy of their report, which categorized prevention strategies according to four “tiers” of efficacy and effectiveness, to every college and university President in the United States. Research by Nelson and colleagues (2010) indicated variable patterns of implementation of “Tier 1” prevention strategies based on the recommendations in this report. In 2012, NIAAA commissioned creation of the College Alcohol Intervention Matrix (CollegeAIM), an enhanced evidence-based alcohol prevention strategy selection tool that categorized strategies according to effectiveness and cost, which was published in 2015 and updated in 2019. Though a crucial and highly-regarded reference for college and university prevention personnel, CollegeAIM doesn’t fully answer the question “Why should we invest our resources to implement BASICS (or other highly-effective indicated approaches) on our campus?” This session will engage with prevention personnel to answer this critical question, discussing how to “make the case” for moderate- to higher-cost prevention strategies to campus administrators, especially within a limited resource environment.

Tuesday, April 6
1:00pm-2:00pm

QPR for Emergency Service Professionals
Track: Law Enforcement + more information

Presenter: Kathleen Ratcliff, MPA, CPS, Executive Director, Upstream Prevention Inc.

QPR stands for Question, Persuade, and Refer — the 3 simple steps anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide. Just as people trained in CPR and the Heimlich Maneuver help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone to help. This training will also include QPR’s Bonus CALM Module, which addresses the importance of reducing lethal means, especially firearms, for those in crisis.

Wednesday, April 7
1:00pm-2:00pm

Suicide Prevention: A Move toward Wellness on College Campuses
Track: Mental Health + more information

Presenter: Jackie Kibler, Associate Professor, Northwest Missouri State University

The purpose of this presentation is to supplement current traditional suicide prevention models with a wellness model that can benefit staff and college students. The health of teachers and staff directly impacts the health of college students. Participants will learn a wellness model, as it applies to suicide prevention, and have opportunities to practice and apply strategies within this interactive session. The session will discuss unique stressors that currently are influencing today’s college population, including developmental trends. Pathways that lead individuals from stressors to unhealthy coping strategies and thus crisis states will be identified. The session will include ample time to identify, discuss, and practice healthy coping strategies.

Thursday, April 8
10:00am-11:00am

How to Create an Intersectional Bystander Movement
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX + more information

Presenter: Katryna Sardis, Coordinator, RSVP Center, University of Missouri

Taking a collaborative and intersectional approach to bystander intervention that goes beyond instances of power-based personal violence to give the students, faculty, and staff the tools and skillset to create safer communities. Through this approach, we can strive to create a campus community that promotes holistic wellness through bystander intervention. This program will work to educate other campuses on how to create their own personalized bystander intervention workshops that meet the needs and wants of their campus. Our presentation will walk the audience members through the developmental stages of our workshop, the difference between the 1 hour and 4-hour workshops, guide through examples used in the workshop and educate them on who has and where to find the content knowledge on campus.

Friday, April 9
12:00pm-6:00pm
Saturday, April 10
9:00am-12:00pm

Peer Education Virtual Leadership Weekend
+ more information

Presenter: Katryna Sardis, Coordinator, RSVP Center, University of Missouri

Taking a collaborative and intersectional approach to bystander intervention that goes beyond instances of power-based personal violence to give the students, faculty, and staff the tools and skillset to create safer communities. Through this approach, we can strive to create a campus community that promotes holistic wellness through bystander intervention. This program will work to educate other campuses on how to create their own personalized bystander intervention workshops that meet the needs and wants of their campus. Our presentation will walk the audience members through the developmental stages of our workshop, the difference between the 1 hour and 4-hour workshops, guide through examples used in the workshop and educate them on who has and where to find the content knowledge on campus.

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Week 6: April 12-April 16

Tuesday, April 13
1:00pm-2:00pm

Menthol is the Back Story: Decriminalization of Commercial Tobacco Products - An Important Way to Make Black Lives Matter
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Dr. Phillip Gardiner

Tobacco industry marketing and tobacco control policies have disproportionately impacted communities of color, maintaining racial disparities at a high cost to individuals and communities. Coupled with the raging COVID-19 pandemic that has exposed the underlying systematic racism that has gripped black and brown communities for hundreds of years. It is now time to understand that impact, and reform laws and policies to ensure their enforcement does not create new or perpetuate existing inequities. Guiding principles that help address tobacco addiction and reduce tobacco-related harms while maintaining and improving the efficacy of enforcement of commercial tobacco laws and policies will be discussed. This session will cover the marketing of menthol products, the important of how policies and penalties are structures to protect the vulnerable, treat the addicted and how to hold a predatory industry accountable.

Wednesday, April 14
1:00pm-2:00pm

Caring for Yourself While Caring for Students: Advice & Strategies from a Mental Health Counselor
Track: Mental Health + more information

Presenter: Anne Rulo, Mental Health Counselor

The challenges of the past year have placed additional strain on students as well as the faculty and staff who care for them. This program will discuss how to be present with students in crisis, while also managing your own self-care and risk for burnout. The goal is to leave feeling equipped, relieved, and capable to help students without wearing yourself out.

Thursday, April 15
1:00pm-2:00pm

Hazing and Consent Training: The Social Science of Hazing
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX + more information

Presenter: Susie Bruce, M.Ed., Director, Gordie Center, University of Virginia

One of the most persistent challenges in ending hazing is that many people assume hazing victims can give consent. This interactive training addresses the social science of hazing to explain why giving informed consent is nearly impossible. Participants will learn about psychological aspects of hazing that makes it so coercive, common misconceptions about hazing and consent, and what individuals and organizations can do to intervene and prevent hazing. To get the most out of this presentation, have a second internet-enabled device (iPad, smartphone, etc.) so you can engage with audience questions using Mentimeter.

Friday, April 16
1:00pm-2:00pm

Coloring Outside the Lines: How Encouraging Creativity in Academia Can Support Student Success
Track: Health and Well-Being + more information

Presenter: Anne Rulo, Mental Health Counselor

Regardless of the category of your creativity, it takes vulnerability and risk-taking to step into something you have not done before. This workshop will explore barriers to creativity, practical steps when getting started with a creative activity as well as internal and external supports you can put in place to keep you going. Creativity will be discussed both within and outside of the arts (i.e. writing vs. business leadership). Whether you need personal support to pursue your design or you are in a position at your school where you motivate others who are seeking to discover more about who they are, this workshop will give you valuable takeaways. Vulnerability, risk-taking, and growth mindset will be guiding principles in this workshop.

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Week 7: April 19-23

Monday, April 19
10:00am-11:00am

Cannabis 101: The Basics on Cannabis/Marijuana and Discussing the Science with Students
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Jason R. Kilmer, Ph.D.

In this presentation, we will review the growing body of science related to the effects of cannabis on health, mental health, academic outcomes, and other impacts relevant to college students. Some of the challenges related to research (including changing concentration/potency and the need to account for placebo/expectancy effects) will be discussed. Implications for conversations with students will be considered.

Tuesday, April 20
10:00am-11:00am

Supporting Tobacco-free Policy Implementation and Compliance
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Dr. Melinda Ickes, University of Kentucky

Tobacco use continues to be a concern on college campuses, particularly given the association between tobacco use and other risk behaviors. Comprehensive tobacco-free campus policies help to protect the community, and support those who are dependent in quitting. This session will discuss the importance of a 100% tobacco-free campus policy including the components necessary for successful adoption and implementation. Discussion will walk through the processes that support policy adoption, and compliance and enforcement approaches to support policy success. Consideration will be given to wellness ambassador programs and encouraging community-based approaches to achieve policy compliance.

Wednesday, April 21
10:00am-11:00am

Re-examining Suicidality using a Racially Conscious Framework
Track: Mental Health + more information

Presenters: Dr. Kamesha Spates, Associate Professor, Kent State University

The long-term impact concerning the Covid-19 pandemic’s impact on Black Americans at-risk for suicide remains to be seen. Developing culturally specific knowledge about suicide in the Black community is an important step towards effective prevention and intervention. This workshop will raise awareness about suicidality among Black Americans, discuss the historical and contemporary reasonings behind the empirical knowledge gap, and provide culturally responsive techniques that can be applied to work with Black Americans. This workshop is appropriate for individuals with or without specialized knowledge on the topic.

Thursday, April 22
10:00am-11:00am

Coordinating A Violence Prevention Program During a Pandemic: An overview of useful software and adaptations made for Bystander Prevention Initiatives in Higher Education
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX + more information

Presenter: Wesley Hobson, Violence Prevention Specialist, University of Central Missouri

During the Spring semester of 2020, the COVID-19 Pandemic emerged and program coordinators across the spectrum of higher education were forced to begin implementing in a virtual sphere. During that journey, a variety of software and applications have risen to prominence. These useful tools assist violence prevention specialists in presenting violence prevention overviews, advising student organizations, and facilitating cross-campus team meetings. This session will provide an opportunity to to learn more about the pros and cons of existing virtual tools and tips on enhancing in-person presentations when social distancing is required.

Friday, April 23
1:00pm-2:00pm

Medical Marijuana: Regulation, Current Evidence, and Recent Trends
Track: Health and Well-Being + more information

Presenter: Dr. Lucas Buffaloe, Associate Professor of Clinical Family and Community Medicine, University of Missouri Health Care

This session will address the regulation of medical cannabis in the state of Missouri, current evidence on the effectiveness of cannabis in the treatment of physical and mental health problems, risks associated with cannabis use, and other considerations for individuals using medical cannabis. This session will also explore recent national trends in cannabis use changing attitudes towards cannabis use, including implications for use by college students.

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Week 8: April 26-30

Monday, April 26
1:00pm-2:00pm

A Timeline of the Opioid Epidemic: How did we Create this Perfect Storm?
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Dr. Fred Rottnek, Professor and Program Director, Addiction Medicine Fellowship, Saint Louis University

The current opioid epidemic is a perfect storm of poor prescribing practices, novel and creative marketing of pharmaceuticals, and the modern conveniences of overnight delivery and social. In this presentation, participants will track medical practice and legislation that started with the invention of the hypodermic syringe in the 1840’s to legislation passed over 100 years ago the impacts medical practice today. Participants will watch the pendulum swing from addiction as a disease to addiction as moral failing, and then back to the current recognition of substance use disorders as a chronic, primary, brain disease that can be treated.

Tuesday, April 27
1:00pm-2:00pm

Alcohol, Marijuana and Athletic Team Success
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Susie Bruce, Director, Gordie Center, University of Virginia

Student-athletes are more likely to experience harm related to alcohol use compared to their non-athlete peers; however, many student-athletes are unaware that alcohol and marijuana can negatively impact athletic performance. This interactive presentation reviews the performance impacts of alcohol use (including on aerobic capacity, immune response and injury recovery) and marijuana use. The latest NCAA research on student-athlete substance use norms, and considerations for adapting social norms-based interventions will be addressed. To get the most out of this presentation, have a 2nd internet-enabled device (iPad, smartphone, etc.) so you can easily play the online games.

Wednesday, April 28
10:00am-11:00am

Thwarting Suicide: Advanced Trauma-Informed Strategies
Track: Mental Health + more information

Presenter: Heidi B. Miller, MD, Medical Director of the St. Louis Regional Health Commission and Primary Care Doctor at Family Care Health Centers

We are a product of everything that has happened to us. Traumatic events can cumulatively poison our well-being if their impact is misunderstood and mistreated. This presentation will focus on the effects of trauma, its relation to suicide, its physiologic manifestations, early signs for intervention, and the utilization of trauma-informed care as a protective factor against suicide. Content will include evidence-based peer-reviewed principles, illustrative patient case narratives, and reflections on the shady medical history of blaming patients for their problems. The format will be interactive, including instantaneous anonymous audience surveying, in order to share personal examples and best practices to address traumatic stress. A pragmatic approach to trauma-informed care, with compassion for both patient and caretaker, will be emphasized.

Thursday, April 29
1:00pm-2:00pm

There’s Hope! Healing from Interpersonal and Sexual Violence
Track: Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Title IX + more information

Presenters: Donna St. Sauver, Advisor, Redhawks Rising Students, Southeast Missouri State University

Empowered survivors lead this interactive program that looks at the healing process from interpersonal and sexual violence. These student leaders from Southeast Missouri State University share successes and challenges they faced during their path to healing from rape and assault. Learn specific strategies that helped these students beat the drop-out statistics of victims and stay on course to achieve the goals that brought them to university. Discover self-care strategies that enabled these survivor leaders to experience post-traumatic growth. Participate in our expressive arts therapy activities which raise awareness, increase support of survivors, and are easy to customize and facilitate when you return to your campus.

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Week 9: May 3-7

Tuesday, May 4
1:00pm-2:00pm

E-cigarettes, Vaping, and Evidence-based Tobacco Treatment among College Students
Track: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention + more information

Presenter: Dr. Michael Steinberg, Professor and Chief, Division of General Internal Medicine, Vice-Chair for Research at the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Medical Director of the Rutgers Tobacco Dependence Program/Center for Tobacco Studies

Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death and disease. Effective, evidence-based treatments exist for tobacco dependence, and local community tobacco treatment resources can be developed. The entry of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) into the market has complicated tobacco control messages, especially for young adults. This presentation will review the existing evidence regarding ENDS - their potential harms and use as a cessation tool - along with clinical practice guidelines for tobacco dependence treatment.

Wednesday, May 5
1:00pm-2:00pm

Mental Health Screening on College Campuses
Track: Mental + more information

Presenter: Marie-Laure Firebaugh, Senior Clinical Research Coordinator and Coordinator of the Missouri Eating Disorders Council’s Body U Program, Washington University School of Medicine

The prevalence of mental health problems among college populations has risen steadily in recent decades, with one-third of college students struggling with anxiety, depression, or an eating disorder. Yet, only 20-40% of college students with mental disorders receive treatment. Inadequacies in care result in prolonged illness, poorer prognosis, and greater likelihood of relapse. Marie-Laure Firebaugh, LMSW will discuss the importance of screening on college campuses by reviewing the Missouri Eating Disorders Council’s Body U Program and a study funded by the National Institute of Health, Harnessing Mobile Technology to Reduce Mental Health Disorders in College Populations. Firebaugh will review approaches for dissemination of screening on college campuses, provide an overview of common mental health problems on college campuses, and discuss the benefits of screening.

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Closing Session

Friday, May 7
10:00am-12:00pm

Experiences in Effective Prevention: Past, Present, and Future + more information

Presenter: Rich Lucey, Senior Prevention Program Manager, Drug Enforcement Administration’s Community Outreach and Prevention Support Section

Rich has nearly three decades of experience in the drug misuse prevention field at state and federal government levels, with a specific focus on preventing drug misuse among college students. In this keynote presentation, Rich will highlight current drug use rates among college students, including marijuana, vaping, and prescription drug misuse; identify the seven keys to a successful drug misuse prevention program on campus; and outline the Drug Enforcement Administration’s community outreach and prevention support efforts for colleges and universities.

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